Perform role-play skits to show both positive and negative pair-programming dynamics so that students have memorable and easy to reference examples when providing constructive criticism to other students.

Like 
  • Acting out pair programming interactions through a role-playing can make the lessons more memorable to students than a list of rules.
  • Pick a student in your class, or ask for a volunteer, to help you with perform the role-play.
    • Explain to the student what role they will be playing and the types of things you’ll be saying during the skit.
  • Spend 2-3 minutes role-playing for the class. Below are some scenarios to try out where the team refers to you and your student actor.
    • Effective pair programming examples:
      • The team works together to solve a problem.
      • The team checks with each other to see what they should do next.
      • The team shares ideas with each other.
    • Ineffective pair programming examples:
      • The navigator takes the keyboard and mouse.
      • The navigator commands the driver.
      • The navigator is unengaged and doesn’t respond to the driver’s questions.
  • After you finish the role-play skit, call on students to note the positive and negative interactions they observed.
  • When you observe students demonstrating positive or negative behaviors that were included in the role-play skit, draw attention to it.
    • Use these moments as a reminder for a student and then ask them how other people might have been feeling in that situation or in that role play.
    • You can start this conversation by saying to the student, “Does this seems similar to what we saw in the role-play yesterday?”
Perform role-play skits to show both positive and negative pair-programming dynamics